BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) – Louisiana’s secretary of state and attorney general asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to put a hold on a federal judge’s order for the state to create a second majority Black congressional district by Monday.

Judge Shelly Dick’s ruling “throws the election process into chaos, and creates confusion statewide,” said a 51-page motion filed for Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin by the attorney general’s office.

The judge refused to give legislators another 10 days on Thursday, again calling the arguments by Senate President Page Cortez and House Speaker Clay Schexnayder disingenuous and insincere. She noted that with less than a week to do the work, legislators met for only 90 minutes on Wednesday, the first day of a special session for redistricting.

On Thursday, a Senate committee met to discuss a map that mirrors the current map, along with one that would carve out a second majority-Black district.

Redistricting has divided the Republican-dominated legislature and Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, since February, when the legislature approved a congressional map with white majorities in five of six districts.

Edwards vetoed it, saying that because Louisiana’s population is nearly one-third Black, at least two districts should have African American majorities. The legislature overrode his veto. Dick then ordered legislators to create new districts, including two that are majority Black, ruling that the current map violates the Voting Rights Act by diluting the impact of voting by Black people.

Friday’s motion argued that “this case presents the exact question” justices will decide in an Alabama case, so the two should either be consolidated or Louisiana’s case should wait until Alabama’s is decided.

In her original 152-page ruling on June 6, Dick noted that when the justices stayed Alabama’s redistricting order, that state’s primary was much closer. Louisiana holds its open congressional primary on Nov. 8, the same day as the general election. Candidates must file to run by July 22.

“A stay increases the risk that Plaintiffs do not have an opportunity to vote under a nondilutive congressional map until 2024, almost halfway through this census cycle,” she wrote three days later, refusing to put a hold on her order.

McConnaughey reported from New Orleans. AP reporter Mark Sherman contributed from Washington.